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Temperatures not getting out of the single digits for the last two days have frozen over Upper Saranac Lake. The north basin froze over on Sunday and the entire lake last night. Ice-in is when the ice prevents someone from boating to the deepest part of the lake from all the points on shore. For a history of Ice-in dates visit the US's web page at: usfoundation.net/blog/ice-in-ice-out/ ... See MoreSee Less

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Some mild weather on the horizon Upper Saranac Lake ... See MoreSee Less

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Fish Creek Pond has frozen over but Upper Saranac Lake is still free of ice ... See MoreSee Less

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The Adirondack Lakes Alliance is excited to present our first newsletter. As the 2017 season comes to an end we thank you for your support of ALA and helping to protect our watersheds.
online.flipbuilder.com/fwej/tgzb/mobile/index.html
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Tomorrow is Giving Tuesday. Your gift helps the Upper Saranac Foundation preserve, enhance and protect the natural beauty, environmental quality and recreational enjoyment of the Upper Saranac Lake watershed.We cant do it without your support. Please consider a donation to the Upper Saranac Foundation.
usfoundation.net/donate/
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Happy Thanksgiving from the Upper Saranac Foundation
The USF is thankful for a protected lake, clean water and those that support the Foundations work.
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Winter has arrived on Upper Saranac Lake ... See MoreSee Less

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The first snowfall coating of the season at Upper Saranac Lake ... See MoreSee Less

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Road salt is beginning to be recognized as the acid rain of our times. At the recent Mirror Lake Water Quality Workshop, Dan Kelting from the Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) discussed the regional salinization of Adirondack waters from road salt. A few highlights are below:
• 192,700 tons of road salt are applied in the Adirondack Park each year.
• 6,937,200 tons have been applied since 1980. This is about six times the total load of sulfate and nitrate from acid deposition.
• Median chloride concentrations for lakes with roads in their watersheds are 14x higher than lakes without roads.
• Stream monitoring conducted by AWI and AsRA shows evidence of regional groundwater pollution.
• The Ausable River watershed has the second highest chloride load out of all major watersheds in the park.
It is critical that the public be informed about how road salt is impacting our environment.
Please take 20-minutes to watch Dan's talk. www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQqV34RIIOY
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